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is growing tonight. more than 200,000 protesters have filled cairo's tahrir square. they are angry with their new president, mohamed morsi who said last week that his decisions cannot be challenged by the courts which gives him almost absolute power. and our holly williams is above tahrir square in cairo this evening. holly, what's going on in the crowd behind you now? >> reporter: scott, we are seeing scenes reminisce september of the egyptian revolution. tahrir square was once again carpeted in people today, tens of thousands of people who poured in from every direction and they were chanting the same slogan that they chanted during the revolution. the people want the downfall of the regime. i was out on this square earlier today talking to people. some people are saying that they won't leave the streets until president morsi rescinds the decrees that have given him sweeping new powers. we've seen very low-level violence here in cairo, but in several other cities there have been violent confrontations between president morsi's supporters and his opponents. >> pelley: is there any
'll debate it. and the protests in cairo, the white house refuses to condemn the egyptian president's dictator-like grab. all of that, and a "hannity" shootout with juan williams and more. "hannity" starts right now. tonight as the fiscal cliff drama unfolds on capitol hill, we'll take a step back and look at how we got to this point. namely, how do we become a nation buried under more than $16 trillion debt, why crippling defense cuts, and the largest tax increase will take hold in 35 days because your elected officials don't know how to stop spending money. let me first play a small part of one of the most memorable inaugural addresses of all time. >> my fellow americans, ask not what your country can do for you, ask what you can do for your country. >> sean: sadly five decades removed from that iconic speech, the democratic party, its leaders, and countless other americans, rely on government for too many things. instead of asking what they can do for their country, they're asking what their country can do for them. now the debt record is at record levels, tax rates are soaring,
into the central square in cairo to call for an end to the new egyptian leader's regime. it was an enormous show of strength from the opposition that spent days blasting egypt he is new president, morsi. he upset just about everybody last week when he decided to give himself broad new powers that say his decisions don't need approval from any court. essentially he's above the law. really no different than a dictator. protests showed their across the country, some of them violent. street fighting this between demonstrators and police. president morsi tried to calm the criticism by promising to reserve his new powers for only the most important decisions. but that didn't appease the protesters. remember, just last week, the united states was publicly praising president morsi when he helped end the conflict between israel and gaza. the white house says president obama has not spoken to his egyptian counterpart since then and today the press secretary jay carney said basically the egyptians need to work this out themselves. there is no evidence that will happen any time soon. right now this enormous
. they clashed with police again in the streets of cairo. the protests began last week after morsi issued a decree last thursday giving himself near absolute power. nbc's jim maceda joins us live from cairo and may be movement of new constitution? >> reporter: right. well, you have got this whole -- this is really basically a constitutional crisis from the beginning. you know, tamron pitting morsi against the judiciary so we're going to see it playing out in the courts and the streets but what happened today was that egypt's highest appeals court known as the court of casation said to suspend the work and effectively going on strike. but and it would stay on strike it's saying until morsi cancels his controversial decree giving as you say absolute power, almost absolute power. now that court joined by a number of lower appeals courts today, as well. and the level of criticism from the judges, tamron, really unprecedented. they said that morsi's decree, quote, defies belief. many other judges and lawyers and journalists have now got on didn't bandwagon and striking. so far, morsi is defian
. >> unbelievable. more than 100,000 people flooded into downtown cairo. this time they are protesting the current president martha maccallum and his power grab. they are disillusioned with what he has brought to their country. then you have this happening. police firing teargas. gypt's highest courts refusing to work in protest of morsi's actions. steve harrigan is streaming live from cairo. the protests looked like the unrest we saw in that same square back in 2009 and the arab spring and the overthrow of mubarak. how dangerous is it? is it more dangerous now? >> this certainly allows similarities between what we saw last night and those demonstrations that overthrew mubarak. hundreds of thousands of people are energized. many of them want this president out. but a couple of important differences. the current president martha maccallum was elected by 52% of the vote just five months ap a - the current president mohamed morsi haas elected by 52% of the vote. martha: it was a close election and the other choice may have been a more democratic choice. people were searching for new leadership and th
, but it's in many of the papers this morning, angry protesters filling tahrir square in cairo. they're stepping up pressure for their president to rescind a decree that they say threaten the nation with a new era of autocracy. there's the picture on the front page of the washington times. we will be talking about this on sunday on the washington journal. back to the phone calls. john in san jose, california, independent. caller: thanks so much for having me. good morning. i have a really good friend who's a teacher at a high school we attended when we were in high school. one of the things she complains about the most is just how rigid the system is. really, i think it's ironic that we continue to say teachers are important, although teachers for the most part are not in charge of their own profession. the system should be a little bit more organic in the sense that if a teacher has a great idea she can rally real talent her or him. the other of thing i wanted to share is there's a whole system within the system that provides individualized education plans to students who have speci
the fiscal cliff. >>> developing now, new clashes in cairo, egypt today, between protesters and police. the protesters have been demanding that egypt's new president rescind the decree he had last thursday granting him absolute power. tens of thousands of protesters rallied in caikacairo's tahrir square. two of e jim's top courts today suspended their work in protest of president mohamed morsi's decr decree. joining me to talk more about the middle east is ambassador dennis ross, an expert on the region. he was the chief middle east negotiate for president clinton and president bush and served as a special adviser for president obama. he is a mideast analyst. both supporters and opponents are planning more giant protests on friday as well as sad. what's your assessment of the situation and the back and forth between the two sides? >> well, i think what we're seeing is is that this is a new egypt. anybody who thought that president morsi could come in and act like president mubarak and could rule as opposed to govern, there's no doubt that's not the case. there's no doubt he miscalculat
the shootdown as a turning point in the country's ongoing and deadly civil war. >>> in egypt, cairo's tahrir square is a tinderbox as protests against president morsi continue to grow. more than 200,000 people jammed the square to demonstrate against morsi's brazen power grab. tensions are growing across egypt, and alex marquadt reports now from cairo. >> reporter: the birthplace of egypt's revolution once again ringing with calls for the downfall of a dictator. this time it's for this man, president mohamed morsi, whom america relies on to be a regional peace broker. last week he granted himself unchecked power, leading to today's bloody clashes. the crowd is chanting the same chants we heard two years ago during the revolution, except that they have substituted mubarak for morsi. egyptians toppled president hosni mubarak, a dictator who ruled for three decades. they then held a historic election, voted in the new president, and now -- >> he's like a pharoah. >> reporter: morsi's office says the move is just temporary, to sideline remnants of the mubarak era and put egypt on the right track
Search Results 0 to 8 of about 9 (some duplicates have been removed)